Copyright 1998 - 2012 Stephen Mugglin

Permission is given to make not-for-profit copies of this material.

Chord Charts and Maps


These charts and maps are designed to print on one page.


In the “Chord Picture” diagrams, the notes shown are played by the right hand. The bass note, played by the left hand, is not shown. Usually the bass note is the same letter name as the chord. For example, any chord with the name C (Cm6, CM7...) would have a C as its bass note.


Scales

Scale Diagrams for the Twelve Major Keys


Chord Pictures

Chords With The Name C
More Chords With The Name C
Chords With The Name Db
More Chords With The Name Db
Chords With The Name D
More Chords With The Name D
Chords With The Name Eb
More Chords With The Name Eb
Chords With The Name E
More Chords With The Name E
Chords With The Name F
More Chords With The Name F
Chords With The Name Gb
More Chords With The Name Gb
Chords With The Name G
More Chords With The Name G
Chords With The Name Ab
More Chords With The Name Ab
Chords With The Name A
More Chords With The Name A
Chords With The Name Bb
More Chords With The Name Bb
Chords With The Name B
More Chords With The Name B


Chord Progression Maps

The Big Map In C
The Big Map In Db
The Big Map In D
The Big Map In Eb
The Big Map In E
The Big Map In F
The Big Map In Gb
The Big Map In G
The Big Map In Ab
The Big Map In A
The Big Map In Bb
The Big Map In B


The Generic Map

The Generic Map for Major Scales
"G" at Harp On encouraged me to create a generic map
and this is the result. It has a few more green circles, and a few more connections.


How Were the Maps Developed?


While studying music theory in college, I was introduced to ideas pertaining to chords and chord flow. After leaving college, I was teaching piano to young students for a while. Searching for ways to make chord flow accessible to young minds, I began drawing diagrams that would allow a child to create strong progressions. It seemed best to put each chord at a visual location with arrows to direct the flow. I experimented with different variations before choosing what I now call the Simple Map. Years later, I added the secondary chords that make the Big Map look the way it does. A few adjustments were made to create the Generic Map.


I hope these pages, charts, and maps will help you understand chords and how they flow together. Enjoy writing music. Love and peace to all.


Ready for the Next Lesson?


This way to Part Six.


The materials on this website (Parts 1-12) 
plus the Chord Charts and Maps
are also available as a downloadable
PDF eBook. Click here for details.http://mugglinworks.com/chordmaps/ChordmapsPDFeBook.htm

Read offline, or on your iPad.

Music Tools for Peoplehttp://musictoolsforpeople.com/
An Interactive, Playable Version of 
The Big Map (for Windows computers)

Allows you to hear and see the chords
presented in The Big Map.

Free Trial available to test on your computer.
When buying the Full Version, choose your own price.

MusicToolsForPeople.comhttp://musictoolsforpeople.com/

Other Resources

ChordMapMidihttp://mugglinworks.com/ChordMapMidiEnter
A Songwriting, Chord-Exploring Instrument
You Hold in the Palm of Your Hand

(for iPhone and iPod Touch - iOS 5.1 or higher)
(also plays on iPad in 2x mode)http://mugglinworks.com/ChordMapMidiEnter
First Steps in Keyboard - Part 1
Learn to play 72 chords.
This is a downloadable PDF eBook. 
Click here for details.http://mugglinworks.com/FirstStepsInKeyboardPDFeBook